• Michael Dahdal

Asking The Right Questions

Updated: Jan 3, 2020


Too often we get caught up asking all the wrong questions.

The problem with asking the wrong questions is you inevitably get the wrong kind of answers.

Your life, any human life for that matter, is filled with infinite potential and infinite potential almost by default suggests an infinite amount of possibilities.

This is where we tend to get it wrong.

You see, you have to know that you are wired for survival and your brains main function is to keep you physically alive.

This is good, because it keeps you alive, but limiting, because it’s underlying interest is simply to keep you alive.

It’s not so interested in you realising any kind of inherent potential; it’s primarily concerned with your preservation alone.

It’s doesn't call on you to seek out life; it calls on you instead to simply try and avoid death.

So instead of allowing you to ask the fundamental question, “What is possible?” – it spends it’s time reminding you of what is not.

It’s doesn’t want you to assume any risk or venture into the unknown, this is too much of a burden to bear.

So instead of encouraging you to embrace your God given potential, you’re instead encouraged to keep worrying about all the ways you might fail.

Finding all the reasons in the world to convince you that you can’t do something, and very few reasons to convince you that you actually can.

To keep you living in fear that something bad might happen, rather than consider the potential for good.

It’s the same reason why we essentially remember bad news and why we are seemingly attracted to the negative over the positive.